Learning with Technology for Teaching Online (iTeach)

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Leeward CC
Updated: 3 hours 18 min ago

Create Your Online Course- FREE registration until April 14, 2017!

Wed, 2017-03-22 11:42

Want to create your online course? You have a wealth of experience!
  • You teach with clear student learning outcomes.
  • You create and assemble content that supports those outcomes.
  • You create activities, interactions and assessments that help your learners meet those outcomes.

When you teach online you use the same learning process. However, you create your entire online learning environment before the course begins.

Create Your Online Course is a week long working lab. Creating an online course is a lot of work. This workshop will give you the head start you need.
​Sign up today for free*. Seats are limited!

  1. Register to reserve your seat at the conference.
  2. Send a $50 check payable to Leeward Community College for the required returnable deposit. Please make it Attention to Educational Media Center. Or you may drop off cash payment.
  3. Your seat will be reserved once we receive your payment.

*Deposit will be returned on Thurs. May 18, 2017 for those who attended during the week. (Leeward CC only)

eCAFE- instructors can make changes and enable surveys now!

Mon, 2017-03-06 13:21

The online Course and Faculty Evaluation System (eCAFE) is open now, through Apr 13, 2017.  To use the system, please log in to eCAFE at http://www.hawaii.edu/ecafe using your UH username and password.

If you enable any of your surveys for courses that follow the normal academic calendar, your students will start using the system on Apr 17, 2017, and eCAFE will remain open to them through May 4, 2017.  On Apr 17, 2017, you will receive an email providing instructions for the eCAFE system which you should forward to your students. The email will introduce eCAFE and provide instructions on using the system.

If you would like to use eCAFE for courses that do not follow the normal academic calendar, log on to eCAFE, select questions and open the survey when you want your students to complete evaluations.  The survey will close after the last day of instruction.

Please direct all questions and comments to the appropriate contact for your campus, found at http://www.hawaii.edu/ecafe/contact.jsp

Mahalo,

eCAFE Project Team
Information Technology Services

Ecafe Basics

  • What is eCAFE?
    • eCAFE is the official application for Course And Faculty Evaluations at the University of Hawaii. It is a UH system wide tool for faculty across all campuses to gather feedback from the students at the end of a course.
  • Who can use eCAFE?
    • UH instructors teaching one or more classes and students enrolled in one or more classes can use eCAFE. eCAFE can also be set up for staff members from the different campuses, colleges, divisions, departments and subjects to administer eCAFE for their organization.
  • How do I get access to eCAFE?
    • UH instructors and students login with their regular UH username and password. Staff members must be set up before they have access. If your organization would like to set up an administrative eCAFE account, please contact your campus coordinator.
  • How does eCAFE work?

The LMS market glacier is melting

Mon, 2017-02-13 16:22
Posted Sep 2, 2016 by (@philonedtech). The LMS market glacier is melting

 

Phil Hill is a partner at MindWires Consulting, co-publisher of the e-Literate blog and co-producer of e-Literate TV.

The world of edtech is strange and full of apparent contradictions. Venture capital investment has exploded since 2010, hitting an all-time high of $3.1 billion in 2015, with private equity and strategic acquisitions pushing this number even higher.

Dozens of startups, if not more, vie for the attention of presidents and provosts. If you look at adoption rates by schools, just one category continues to consume the majority of edtech attention and budgets in higher education: the much-maligned learning management system (LMS). But the glacier may be melting.

It would be easy to look at the market trends today for higher ed and think that nothing much has changed over the last decade. Despite the success of more recent entrants like Instructure and Schoology, Blackboard has, by far, the greatest market share, with companies like D2L, Sakai and open-source alternatives like Moodle far behind. The LMS oligopoly is nothing if not resilient, historically leaving little space for competition.

But this view by itself would be misleading. Higher education moves at glacial speeds, and judging the market based on the surface issues misses some important recent dynamics.

It’s true that Blackboard still has greater market share than any other technology player in higher education. But Instructure’s Canvas LMS won almost 80 percent of new higher education implementations this year — a shift that may reflect the growing influence of faculty, rather than institutional, priorities in LMS purchasing. Consider this: While the LMS reached a saturation point among colleges and universities around 2003, it is only in the past 3-4 years that the vast majority of courses or faculty members routinely used an LMS.

The challenges to higher education’s tech-enabled transformation are multifaceted.

The established legacy providers (e.g. Blackboard and D2L) are, in turn, investing millions of dollars in re-architecting their platforms to reside in the cloud and enable a new approach to the user experience. And while platform switching was historically driven by forced migrations (Blackboard buying competitors and terminating product lines), today’s selections are most often rooted in involuntary reasons, such as moving to the cloud or improving the end users’ experience.

Perhaps most significantly, most schools are no longer looking for just one system to manage the virtual classroom. We are now seeing entire institutions, such as Southern New Hampshire University and University of Maryland University College, designing new architectures where the LMS is but one core component. This move is enabling broader adoption of pedagogical approaches, such as competency-based education and personalized learning.

Once we get broader adoption of new pedagogies and new student support models, such as institution-wide or discipline-specific adoption, we may see longer-lasting trends and business models for the technologies outside the LMS. Technologies that generate analytics-driven feedback for faculty, provide targeted coaching or advising support for students or enable new learning modalities, such as flipped and blended classrooms, may very well be the beneficiaries of redirected spending and mind share.

Of course, the challenges to higher education’s tech-enabled transformation are multifaceted. Initiative fatigue abounds. Venture-backed apps and solutions are, all too often, reflective of dystopian fantasies about higher education’s mass disruption more so than the real-world needs of faculty — and students.

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning 2017

Mon, 2017-02-13 16:10

Key Issues in Teaching and Learning 2017 1. Faculty Development 2. Academic Transformation 3. Digital & Informational Literacies 4. Accessibility & Universal Design for Learning 5. CBE & Assessment for Student Learning 6. Open Education 7. Online & Blended Teaching & Learning 8. Learning Space Designs 9. Evolution of the Profession 10. Learning Analytics 11. Working with Emerging Technology 12. Evaluating Tech-Based Instructional Innovations 13. NGDLE and LMS services 14. Privacy and Security 15. Adaptive Teaching and Learning 16. iPASS

Want $500? The Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award- APPLY NOW!

Mon, 2017-02-13 14:36

2015 – Christina Keaulana  ED 285  Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences

Purpose

The “Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award” (formerly, “The Outstanding Teaching with Laulima Innovation Award”) seeks to recognize a Leeward Community College faculty or lecturer who teaches an online course that recognizes innovation and excellence in technology-supported teaching, academic collaboration, and student engagement.

Eligibility

Any faculty or lecturer who teaches an online course at Leeward CC (no hybrid courses, please). (A faculty or lecturer who previously applied may re-apply provided he/she has not been chosen as a recipient of this award within the last five (5) years.)

Award Information

  • Application form  Due Feb 28, 2017 3pm. Chancellors Office.
  • Evaluation rubric
  • The value of the award is $500.00
  • After the applications get processed, the applicants will be asked to schedule a date/time to record a 15-minute (maximum) showcase video of their course by demonstrating and verbally describing how their course meets or exceeds the criteria described in the Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award 2016 Rubric.
  • The award committee may require access to the applicants’ courses as part of the selection process.
  • The winner and selected finalists will be showcased on the Innovative Online Teaching Award website following presentation of the award.

Applications are due to the Chancellor’s Office by Monday, February 28, 2017 at 3:00 PM.

APPLY HERE

 

Past Innovation Award Recipients 2016 – Warren Kawano BUSN 158 Business Division 2015 – Christina Keaulana ED 285 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2014 – Jeff Judd ED 290 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2013 – Michael Cawdery ED 285 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2012 – Helmut Kae MICR 130 Microbiology, Math and Sciences 2011 – Lani Uyeno ENG 211 English, Language Arts 2010 – Pat Hurley LING102 English, Language Arts 2009 – Brent Hirata ED 279 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences

 

APPLY NOW! The Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award $500

Mon, 2017-02-06 15:33

2016 IOTA Winner Warren Kawano’s Online Course

Purpose

The “Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award” (formerly, “The Outstanding Teaching with Laulima Innovation Award”) seeks to recognize a Leeward Community College faculty or lecturer who teaches an online course that recognizes innovation and excellence in technology-supported teaching, academic collaboration, and student engagement.

Eligibility

Any faculty or lecturer who teaches an online course at Leeward CC (no hybrid courses, please). (A faculty or lecturer who previously applied may re-apply provided he/she has not been chosen as a recipient of this award within the last five (5) years.)

Award Information

  • Application form  Due Feb 28, 2017 3pm. Chancellors Office.
  • Evaluation rubric
  • The value of the award is $500.00
  • After the applications get processed, the applicants will be asked to schedule a date/time to record a 15-minute (maximum) showcase video of their course by demonstrating and verbally describing how their course meets or exceeds the criteria described in the Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award 2016 Rubric.
  • The award committee may require access to the applicants’ courses as part of the selection process.
  • The winner and selected finalists will be showcased on the Innovative Online Teaching Award website following presentation of the award.

Applications are due to the Chancellor’s Office by Monday, February 28, 2017 at 3:00 PM.

APPLY HERE

 

  You are almost definitely not living in reality because your brain doesn’t want you to

Wed, 2017-02-01 12:55

You are almost definitely not living in reality because your brain doesn’t want you to

 Buster Benson, Quartz, Oct 14, 2016

Commentary by Stephen Downes

Good article listing sources of cognitive bias (always an interest of mine). Numerous links. “In order to avoid drowning in information overload, our brains need to skim and filter insane amounts of information…

  • Information overload sucks, so we aggressively filter.
  • Lack of meaning is confusing, so we fill in the gaps.
  • We need to act fast lest we lose our chance, so we jump to conclusions.
  • This isn’t getting easier, so we try to remember the important bits.

By keeping these four problems and their four consequences in mind (we) will ensure that we notice our own biases more often.” The item called to my recollection a CBC interview I listened to this morning with Julia Shaw, author of The Memory Illusion: Why you might not be who you think you are.At least, I think I listened to it.

Do Quizzes Improve Student Learning? A Look at the Evidence

Wed, 2017-02-01 12:32

February 1st, 2017

By:

There’s a lot of talk these days about evidence-based instructional practices, so much that I’ve gotten worried we aren’t thinking enough about what that means. Let me see if I can explain with an example.

Recently I’ve been trying to locate the evidence that supports quizzing, wondering if it merits the evidence-based label. Tracking down this evidence in our discipline-based research is challenging because although quizzing has been studied across our disciplines, it’s not easily searchable. My collection of studies is good, but I know it’s not complete. As you might suspect, the results are mixed; they are more positive than negative, but still, a significant number of researchers don’t find that quizzes affect learning outcomes.

I’ve been looking closely at a set of seven studies, which you will find listed at the end of the article. (These studies were randomly selected—no empirical objective here.) Not all of the studies report the same positive results, but if they are viewed collectively, the use of quizzes seems to yield some impressive benefits. Students reported they spent more time reading and more time studying between tests, and that they were more motivated to come to class prepared when the course included quizzes. These quizzes also increased student participation, lowered failure rates, improved exam scores, resulted in better overall course grades, and did not lower course evaluations. That all sounds pretty good, doesn’t it?

But the devil is in the details, as in the specific combination of factors and conditions that produced the results. When I looked closely at this subset, I was amazed at the array of details that could potentially affect whether quizzes improve learning.

  • Are they pop quizzes or scheduled on the syllabus?
  • What types of questions are used (multiple choice, short answer, etc.)?
  • What’s the relationship between quiz questions and questions on the exam (same questions, similar questions, or completely different)?
  • How many quizzes are given throughout the semester?
  • When are the quizzes given—before content coverage or after? How soon after?
  • Do students take the quizzes in class or online?
  • Are the quizzes graded or ungraded? If graded, how much do they count?
  • Is the lowest score dropped?
  • What kind of feedback are students provided?

In addition to these design details, there are content variables derived from what’s being taught, the level at which it’s taught, the type of course, and the instructional method used to deliver it. And then there are student variables, such as their year in college and academic performance to date. In all likelihood, the classroom climate exerts some influence on the outcomes as well.

What this evidence tells us is that given a particular set of conditions, quizzes produce positive results, in most cases a range of them. And that gives us three things to consider. First, based on studies done in our disciplines, quizzes are an evidence-based instructional strategy only in a general sense. If your course design details and teaching context aren’t the same as those in the study, you aren’t assured the same results.

Second, to be sure that your quizzes produce the desired results, you need evidence. You can conduct your own empirical analysis. One of the benefits of all these different studies is that they provide a range of different ways quiz performance can be analyzed. That will give you the best evidence, but you can also do something quasi-empirical. You can look at exam scores in sections with and without quiz scores. You can ask students how a course with quizzes affects their attendance, preparation, and study habits. Or, you can carefully, thoughtfully, and objectively observe how quizzes are affecting learning. What we need to stop doing is assuming that just because an instructional strategy has been studied and judged effective, we can use that same strategy and accrue the same benefits.

Finally, looking at a set of studies (whether on quizzing or a range of other instructional strategies) illustrates the profound importance of instructional design. So often, when we decide on an instructional approach, we just do it. Without much thought or purposeful decision-making, we come up with a way to use quizzes. And yet it’s those easy, seemingly minor decisions about the details that determine the outcome.

Remember, though, that you haven’t gotten the whole story here. You’ve gotten the sum of a sample of studies done in our disciplines. Regular repeated testing has been studied elsewhere. In the next post, we’ll continue this consideration of what it means to be an evidence-based instructional strategy.

Resources:

Azorlosa, J. W. (2011). The effect of announced quizzes on exam performance: II. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 38, 3-7.

Batsell, Jr., W. R., Perry, J. L., Hanley, E., and Hostetter, A. B., (2017). Ecological validity of the testing effect: The use of daily quizzes in introductory psychology. Teaching of Psychology, 44 (1), 18-23.

Braun, K. W., and Sellers, R. D. (2012). Using a “daily motivational quiz” to increase student preparation, attendance and participation. Issues in Accounting Education, 27 (1), 267-279.

Hardsell, L. (2009). The effect of quiz timing on exam performance. Journal of Education for Business, 84 (3), 135-141.

Hatteberg, S. J. and Steffy, K., (2013). Increasing reading compliance of undergraduates: An evaluation of compliance methods. Teaching Sociology, 41 (4), 346-352.

Johnson, B. C., and Kiviniemi, M. T. (2009). The effect of online chapter quizzes on exam performance in an undergraduate social psychology course. Teaching of Psychology, 36 (1), 33-37.

Kouyoumdjian, H. (2004). Influence of unannounced quizzes and cumulative final on attendance and study behavior. Teaching of Psychology, 31 (2), 110-111.

© Magna Publications. All rights reserved

Posted in Teaching Professor Blog
Tagged with , , , ,

 

Online Resources

Wed, 2017-01-11 10:53
iLearn

iLearn is designed to help online students succeed at learning online. Please pass on the different resources listed on this site to your online students.

Distance education?

How do you prepare?

How do you succeed?

How do you use Laulima?

Plan

Questions?

Important Resources
  • iTeach– dedicated to helping distance faculty. Here are a few resources you can find at this site.
Laulima

Every semester, new Laulima sites are automatically created for every course you teach. It is up to you to set up each course.

Get your Laulima courses ready

Laulima Support

If you have a question about Laulima you may want to refer to Laulima @ Leeward. If you need further help with Laulima please sign-up for an appointment.

If students do not see your course in Laulima

If your students do not see your course listed in the blue tab bar, check if it is listed under the under the “My Active Sites” tab. If it is not there, please fill out a “Request Assistance” form and provide detailed information about the course you are looking for.

Laulima Orientation Activity

Face-to-Face Laulima Orientation Activity for New DE Students

The Educational Media Center will be providing a face-to face Laulima Orientation Activity

Saturday August  20th from  8:00-9:00 am Room LC102 for new students on how to use Laulima. All DE students have received email notifications inviting them to the orientation activity.

Online Laulima Orientation Activity for New DE Students

The Educational Media Center also provides the Laulima Orientation Activity online for DE students. Here are the directions to complete the activity.

  1. Join the De student orientation Laulima course. After you log into Laulima, in the “My Workspace” tab to the left scroll down and click on “membership.”Once that pops up click on joinable sites. Scroll down until you see “DE Student Orientation. If it is not visible at first go to the top right where it says “show 20 items…” Click on the drop bar and click on “show 200 items…” then look for the DE course. Once you find the DE course click “join” right underneath it.After that you can find the course by either scrolling up and clicking on my “My Current Sites” or by clicking the “My Active Sites” tab at the very top of the page
  2. Here is a short video on how to join the DE Student Orientation course in Laulima. http://youtu.be/WR-bT93mkU4
  3. Complete the Laulima DE Orientation Activity Sheet. https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1fIdPkTnyubD8nxGlcsTdj0duv5VXacrbIfyp7DwY_ZM/viewform
Student Evaluations

eCAFE is the ONLY online evaluation system used for distance courses at Leeward Community College. eCAFE is the official application for Course And Faculty Evaluations at the University of Hawaii. It is a UH system wide tool for faculty across all campuses to gather feedback from the students at the end of a course. Instructors and students login with their regular UH username and password. Please be mindful of the set-up period for Course evaluations.

Ecafe Online Course Evaluation Basics

 

 

 

Blackboard Collaborate Moderator Challenge (Spring 2017)

Wed, 2017-01-11 10:44
Blackboard Collaborate Moderator Challenge (Spring 2017) Register

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at 1:30 PM – to – Friday, January 27, 2017 at 3:00 PM

Leeward CC now has the new Blackboard Collaborate Ultra version, a completely re-designed Blackboard Collaborate Web Conferencing platform that’s simple, mobile-friendly, and can be used to support a 21st-century teaching and learning environment. Use Blackboard Collaborate Ultra to facilitate interactive instruction and host meetings allowing you and your students to learn together and work collaboratively in a synchronous (live) online environment. Features include: two-way audio, multi-point video, interactive whiteboard, application and desktop sharing, breakout groups, session recording, and more.
Workshop Objectives

This is a two-part workshop, held online in Blackboard Collaborate Ultra. Part 1 will allow you to learn how to use Blackboard Collaborate Ultra, including hands-on activities to practice using it for interactive activities. Part 2 will allow you to demonstrate your learning by facilitating your own 5-10 minute interactive session with an audience using Blackboard Collaborate Ultra to do the following:

  1. Interact with the audience using the mic and chat tools (*web cam and raise hand tools).
  2. Load and share an image, PowerPoint, or PDF to the media space.
    Use (and/or have Participants use) a few whiteboard tools (e.g. pointer tool, text tool, pen tool, eraser tool) to interact/engage with your audience and/or with your content or whiteboard on the media space.
  3. Use the polling tool with the audience, show the results, and clear the polling or end the polling session.
  4. Use Application Sharing to share an application on your computer or your computer’s desktop.
  5. *Use Breakout Groups to facilitate a small group activity – create groups, move participants into and out of Breakout Groups, move yourself (Moderator) from room to room.

Upon successful completion, you’ll earn the Blackboard Collaborate Moderator badge (useful to include as evidence in your dossier) and a new Blackboard Collaborate account with the ability to create multiple sessions in the new Ultra experience.

Workshop website: http://blogs.leeward.hawaii.edu/iteach/blackboard-collaborate-moderator-challenge/

UDL Online Activity Challenge

Wed, 2017-01-11 10:36
UDL Online Activity Challenge-Free

Online –Monday, January 23, 2017 at 12:00 AM – Sunday, March 5, 2017 at 3:00 AM (HST)

This challenge is designed to help you redesign an online learning activity, using the three core principles of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework.

The three core principles of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework.

  1. Provide Multiple Means of Representation
  2. Provide Multiple Means of Action and Expression
  3. Provide Multiple Means of Engagement

Schedule

How it Works

  • Mondays
    • On Monday morning you will receive an email with the current week’s “learning path”. Follow the path please. The learning path typically includes: Short overview of week’s topic Link to a challenge webpage overviewing the week’s topic with extra resources to peruse at will. Link to a worksheet you will copy, complete and change the settings to allow for commenting Link to upload and upload to the Google + Community. short close of previous week other info
  • Wednesdays
    • Wednesday email to check-in and see how it’s going. Respond to email if you need help. Reminder of Thursday posting deadline Learning path repeated from Monday. Notice of badges issued from previous week Short blurb on week’s topic other info Thursdays Complete your weekly worksheet by the end of Thursday, and post your results in the Google+ Community.
  • Fridays Pau hana email.
    • Thank you for posting worksheet on time. Reminder of Sunday deadline Short blurb on week’s topic other info
  • Sundays
    • Deadline to comment on other worksheets (2 minimum comments if you like doing the minimum). Provide further insight into to the participant’s results. Practice improving your online interaction with insightful commenting.

Earn a Letter of Completion

When you complete a weekly action plan worksheet and comment on others learners actions plans, you earn a badge.  Earn all 5 badges and you qualify for a Letter of Completion. This letter is a valuable piece of evidence for Contract Renewal, Tenure, and Promotion.

Register