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A College Designed for Adults

At College Unbound, a new institution in Rhode Island, the curriculum and services reflect the life and work experiences of older students. “We’ve tried to become what they needed,” says Adam Bush, its provost.

The Chronicle Report: Making Way for Innovation

Copy and paste this URL into your browser:
http://results.chronicle.com/InnovationReport


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minutes February 12, 2018

Unapproved Minutes Start : 3:06 Attendance: Rachael Inake, Dalybeth Reasoner, Michelle Igarashi, Amy Amper, Warren Kawano, Anane Marie Paikai, Christy Takamure, Matthew Egami, Greg Walker (online) Approval of minutes from January 22, 2018 meeting. Approved (Unanimous) DE Committee Membership New… Read more ›

Agenda February 12, 2018

Approval of minutes from January 22, 2018 meeting DE Committee Membership New member Arts & Humanities Representative APT Definition of Unit Final Approval – DE Interview Questions IOTA Award Update DE Liaison Program Updates: DE Federal Regulations Training DE Faculty… Read more ›

Southern New Hampshire U. Apologizes for Professor Who Said Australia Is ‘Not a Country’

The university acknowledged that an online student had failed an assignment because her instructor insisted Australia was only a continent.

Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award

Purpose

The “Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award” seeks to recognize a Leeward Community College faculty or lecturer who teaches an online course that recognizes innovation and excellence in technology-supported teaching, academic collaboration, and student engagement.

Eligibility

Any faculty or lecturer who teaches an online course at Leeward CC (no hybrid courses, please). (A faculty or lecturer who previously applied may re-apply provided he/she has not been chosen as a recipient of this award within the last five (5) years.)

Award Information
  • Application form
  • Evaluation rubric
  • Evaluation process
  • The value of the award is $500.00
  • After the applications get processed, the applicants will be asked to schedule a date/time to record a 15-minute (maximum) showcase video of their course by demonstrating and verbally describing how their course meets or exceeds the criteria described in the Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award Rubric.
  • The award committee may require access to the applicants’ courses as part of the selection process.
  • The winner and selected finalists will be showcased on the Innovative Online Teaching Award website following presentation of the award.
2017 Award Winner

Past Innovation Award Recipients 2016 – Warren Kawano BUSN 158 Business Division 2015 – Christina Keaulana ED 285 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2014 – Jeff Judd ED 290 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2013 – Michael Cawdery ED 285 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2012 – Helmut Kae MICR 130 Microbiology, Math and Sciences 2011 – Lani Uyeno ENG 211 English, Language Arts 2010 – Pat Hurley LING102 English, Language Arts 2009 – Brent Hirata ED 279 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2017 Online Courses 2016 Online Courses 2015 Online Courses 2014 Online Courses 2013 Online Courses 2012 Online Courses 2011 Online Courses 2010 Online Courses

Most Americans Think AI Will Improve Lives and Eliminate Jobs — Just Not Theirs

Three-quarters of respondents to a new poll think artificial intelligence will have a positive impact on their lives and work. Only 23 percent think it will endanger their jobs.

Leeward OER Spring 2018 Update

Learning with Technology for Teaching - Fri, 2018-01-26 11:46

Here’s a quick re-cap on what’s happening with Open Educational Resources (OER) at Leeward CC.

Open Textbook Network

The Open Textbook Network (OTN) is an alliance of over 600 higher education institutions promoting access, affordability, and student success through the use of open textbooks. OTN maintains the Open Textbook Library, a collection of 453 peer-reviewed open textbooks. The UHCC system recently joined this growing community of open education advocates. Our membership allows UHCC OER advocates to participate in discussions with regional and national leaders, share best practices with other members, and tap into the collective expertise of the network. A highlight this year is an upcoming visit by two presenters from OTN coinciding with HSSI, March 28-29. A presentation is planned for Day 1 and a train-the-trainer workshop on Day 2. The all-day workshop at Honolulu CC is for individuals who will return to their home campuses as open textbook advocates and provide faculty with training opportunities. We are excited to participate in this network and share our successes with colleagues around the U.S.

Spring 2018 Textbook Cost: $0

Preliminary, we now have 273 sections at Leeward that are “textbook cost: $0” leading to a savings of $459,826 and a total savings to-date of $2,087,575. “Textbook cost: $0” “is a designation for a class that does not require students to purchase any course materials out-of-pocket. Classes may use a variety of Open Educational Resources (OERs), online resources, library resources, and faculty-authored materials to replace commercially-produced textbooks” (Go Open, Go Free).

“Go Open, Go Free Using OER” Spring 2018 Workshop

Are you interested in OER or going OER? Register today for the upcoming workshop series from February 13 to March 20 at 1:00 PM -2:30 PM. In this six-week workshop series, participants will learn about no-cost and Open Educational Resources (OER) which have the potential to replace costly commercial textbooks and other course materials.

Workshop Objectives:

  1. Articulating the value of OER in higher education
  2. Defining OER
  3. Distinguishing between openly licensed, public domain, and copyrighted materials
  4. Finding OER in your subject area
  5. Evaluating OER
  6. Understanding the differences in Creative Commons license types
  7. Combining different types of Creative Commons licensed materials
  8. Adding a Creative Commons license to your own work
  9. Giving proper attributions to OER

APPLY NOW! The Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award $500

Purpose

The “Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award” seeks to recognize a Leeward Community College faculty or lecturer who teaches an online course that recognizes innovation and excellence in technology-supported teaching, academic collaboration, and student engagement.

Eligibility

Any faculty or lecturer who teaches an online course at Leeward CC (no hybrid courses, please). (A faculty or lecturer who previously applied may re-apply provided he/she has not been chosen as a recipient of this award within the last five (5) years.)

Award Information
  • Application form
  • Evaluation rubric
  • Evaluation process
  • The value of the award is $500.00
  • After the applications get processed, the applicants will be asked to schedule a date/time to record a 15-minute (maximum) showcase video of their course by demonstrating and verbally describing how their course meets or exceeds the criteria described in the Leeward CC Innovative Online Teaching Award Rubric.
  • The award committee may require access to the applicants’ courses as part of the selection process.
  • The winner and selected finalists will be showcased on the Innovative Online Teaching Award website following presentation of the award.
2017 Award Winner

Past Innovation Award Recipients 2016 – Warren Kawano BUSN 158 Business Division 2015 – Christina Keaulana ED 285 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2014 – Jeff Judd ED 290 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2013 – Michael Cawdery ED 285 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2012 – Helmut Kae MICR 130 Microbiology, Math and Sciences 2011 – Lani Uyeno ENG 211 English, Language Arts 2010 – Pat Hurley LING102 English, Language Arts 2009 – Brent Hirata ED 279 Associate of Arts in Teaching, Social Sciences 2017 Online Courses 2016 Online Courses 2015 Online Courses 2014 Online Courses 2013 Online Courses 2012 Online Courses 2011 Online Courses 2010 Online Courses

Unapproved Minutes January 22, 2018

Meeting called to order at 3:01PM. Attendees : Warren Kawano, Michelle Igarashi, Rachael Inake, Brent Hirata, Annemarie Paikai, Amy Amper Absent: Dalybeth Reasoner, Daniela Dutra Elliott, Karim Khan, Christy Takamure 1.Approval of minutes from December 11, 2017 Unanimous Approved minutes… Read more ›

How Twitter Hooks Up Students With Ghostwriters

It used to be that students had to track down hired pens by themselves. But these days they can unintentionally summon legions of eager writers by merely venting frustration on Twitter.

Colleges Are Key Players in Cities’ Bids to Host Amazon’s 2nd Headquarters

With the online retail giant’s having reduced the number of bidders this week from more than 200 to just 20, the competition is heating up. Experts say the proximity of Amazon and local universities will be mutually beneficial.

What’s New in Laulima 11.4?

Laulima @ Leeward - Wed, 2018-01-17 18:12

Laulima got an upgrade over the winter break! Check out what’s new here and/or watch the recording of the info webinar hosted by our Instructional Designer friends at Kapiolani CC.

What’s New in Laulima 11.4?

Laulima got an upgrade over the winter break! Check out what’s new here and/or watch the recording of the info webinar hosted by our Instructional Designer friends at Kapiolani CC.

What’s New in Laulima 11.4?

Learning with Technology for Teaching - Wed, 2018-01-17 18:12

Laulima got an upgrade over the winter break! Check out what’s new here and/or watch the recording of the info webinar hosted by our Instructional Designer friends at Kapiolani CC.

Students as Authors through Open Pedagogy

Learning with Technology for Teaching - Wed, 2018-01-17 15:56

It has been thrilling to see the Open Educational Resources (OER) Initiative takeoff at Leeward CC. Many instructors have successfully adopted and integrated OER into their classes. The initiative has reduced costs for students and increased student success. As we continue the push toward openness, we would like to encourage you to consider open pedagogy. While there is no single definition of open pedagogy, here is a definition:

Open pedagogy takes OER as a jumping-off point for rethinking the relationship between teachers, students, and knowledge. If teachers and students can now modify their textbooks and learning materials, we shift the student emphasis to contribution to knowledge as opposed to simple consumption of knowledge. Teachers and students become learners together, and “content” becomes a dynamic, always changing category with which we engage rather than a stable set of facts to be mastered. (DeRosa) Submitted by Heather M. Ross

It is always helpful to see examples from other instructors. Here one we would like to share.

The following is a guest blog post by Gloria Niles, PhD, Assistant Professor in Education, UH West Oahu.

After completing a 7-week OER training offered through Leeward Community College in Spring 2017, I had a renewed commitment to reducing or eliminating textbook cost for my courses by using instructional materials that are openly sourced.  I soon realized that projects I already assign could be used to teach my students to openly source and share their work with a global audience. Later, I realized this process had a term, which is  Open Pedagogy.

One assignment, in particular, has evolved over the past three years through Open Pedagogy. EDEE 324 is a required courses in the Elementary Education concentration for Education majors at UHWO. The ʻIke Ola Pono (Health Literacy) Digital Storybook Project is a assignment for Health, Physical Education and Movement (EDEE 324) at the University of Hawaiʻi-West Oʻahu (UHWO). I began this assignment in Fall 015, initially inspired by the Health Literacy Database at Miami University directed by Valerie Ubbes, Ph.D. My initial intention was to create an authentic assessment for teacher candidates (students) in an online course. As the project has evolved, my focus on Open Pedagogy has increased.

The objective of the ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook project is for teacher candidates to develop a children’s story that incorporates aspects of Dr. Ubbes’ Habits of Health and Habits of Mind Model in a story that is culturally responsive to Hawaiian ways of knowing. In 2017, I incorporated the Hawaiʻi Department of Education’s Nā Hopena Aʻo (learning outcomes), adding a requirement that the story align with the Nā Hopena Aʻo as well as Hawaii Content and Performance Standards III for Health.

Beginning in 2017, teacher candidates were encouraged to add a Creative Commons license (which allows individuals to share their work, but retain copyright) to their storybook, and have their book included in the Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. In June 2017, the first titles in the series were shared publicly as part of the Mālama Honua Fair, celebrating the homecoming of the Hōkūleʻa. This event provide the authors the opportunity to showcase their work. As the teacher candidates shared their books with visitors who stopped by the UHWO exhibit space, it was heartwarming to observe the pride the authors had as children were reading their digital book on tablets and laptop computers. Parents and teachers were downloading the QR code to share the storybooks with their children and students.

Some teacher candidate are excited, and other are a bit intimidated at the start of the semester, when they learn they will be required to author and illustrate a children’s book. However, once they review the resources available through articles, videos, and websites, the trepidation turns to enthusiasm. Additionally, reviewing the titles in the Mālama Honua Series provides motivation and desire to see their story included in the series at the end of the course.

In addition to providing a collection of resources to support the process of writing childrenʻs literature and various media that can be used to illustrate their story, I scaffold this semester long project into steps, beginning with formation of peer review teams. During the first week of class, students join a peer review team of 4 to 5 students. The peer review teams each have a private discussion forum where they can share resources, and submit the stages of their project for feedback and review from their teammates. Providing feedback to their teammates also tends to strengthen their own project, and provides a support system.

The first submission is the ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook Plan. Teacher candidates are provided with a planning template to scaffold the planning of their storybook, and identify how the story alignments with standards and outcomes.

The second step is the submission of the First Draft. This includes the manuscript and a storyboard for the conceptual design of the illustrations. Instructor and peer review feedback is provided. I also evaluate the manuscript for the readability level, using Readable.io. This tool provides feedback to determine if the manuscript is written at an appropriate reading level for the target age or grade level.

The third step is the submission of the Final Draft. This is the complete book in a digital format, with text and illustrations in the book format layout. Feedback is provided once again by peer review teammates as well as the instructor.

The published version is the final version of the storybook, submitted as the signature assignment. In the published version, the author is asked to add two lesson activities that can be used to extend learning opportunities, as well as the alignment to Health Education standards and the Nā Hopena Aʻo.

As the instructor, I serve as the editor for the series. As editor, my job is to ensure that illustrations that are not original artwork are correctly attributed, and overall professionalism of the published version. Not every ʻIke Ola Pono Digital Storybook submitted is represented in the series. However, as the series has grown to 23 titles, each semester the teacher candidate seem increasingly motivated to self-assess and produce a high quality project.

In order to continue the evolution of Open Pedagogy, ideas that I am considering are for teacher candidates to revise, remix, reuse titles in the Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. I am also planning Read-Aloud events where authors from the previous semester will read their book to children in local libraries, and in elementary school classrooms.

Key Takeaways

  • Model Use openly licensed instructional materials in your course (articles, textbooks, videos, podcasts, websites.)
  • Authentic assessment. Students are creating a meaningful product that will have an audience.
  • Scaffold Divide a semester-long project into incremental steps with formative feedback and reflection.
  • Self-assessment: Involve students in self-assessment of their work and classroom performance
  • Peer review. Use peer review for support and for improving student work.

 

 

 

 

Sampling of screenshots above are from Mālama Honua Digital Storybook Series. Each storybook has been licensed by the student author under a Creative Commons license.

Agenda January 22, 2018

Approval of minutes from December 11, 2018 DE Committee Membership DE Interview Questions Feedback Examples for questions 8, 10, 11 IOTA Award Dates and Committee DE Liaison Program Updates: DE Federal Regulations Training DE Faculty Survey (Will send out mid-Spring… Read more ›

2 New Threats Highlight Human-Factor Gaps in Cybersecurity Research

To address vulnerabilities like Meltdown and Spectre, computer scientists must consider the work of social scientists. But, argues one expert, they tend to give it short shrift.

Professors Share How Their Learning Environment Changed Their Teaching

Learning with Technology for Teaching - Tue, 2018-01-09 11:18


Video from “A New High-Tech Learning Center Changed How These Professors Teach” by Julia Schmalz from Chronicle of Higher Education (6:17)

Three instructors are highlighted in the video sharing how they design their instruction around the physical space and technology in the classroom. This video highlights teaching strategies such as:

  • active learning
  • paired activities
  • collaborative learning

Laulima Updated to Sakai 11.4

Below is a list of some of the changes on the Laulima system after upgrading from Sakai 10.7 to 11.4.
User Interface/Layout:
Some interface elements have changed in Sakai 11.

  1. Sakai 11 no longer uses iframes, this is the direction the web is going, though now some content will not be embeddable and will have to open in a new tab/window
    1. Because there are no iframes the blue double arrows to reset the middle portion of the page no longer exists.
  2. My Workspace tab is now called Home
  3. The More Sites tab is now Sites
  4. The Log Out link is now found after clicking your account name in the upper right
  5. There is a “bread crumb” navigation bar under the tab cluster
  6. For instructors, when a site is unpublished (not visible to students), It will be indicated by a yellow banner, along with a link to publish the site, below the “bread crumb” navigation bar
  7. The Home tool is now called Overview by default
  8. When you are an instructor in a site, changing to a simulated student view (and back) is now located on the left, above the list of tools, under “View Site As”
  9. The profile image now appears next to your name in the upper left corner of the Laulima window.

Announcements Tool

  • Instructors can reorder via drag and drop (then Update) by clicking the Reorder button

Assignments Tool

  • Grading page allows you to “Navigate between students with submissions only”
  • New feature allows instructors to select multiple students to allow resubmissions
  • Resubmission settings for individual students now apply even after the Accept Until date has past

Gradebook Classic Tool

  • Gradebook is now named Gradebook Classic
  • Issue: When there are categories being used in the Gradebook Classic tool, an error is generated in the “All Grades” view. We are working to resolve this as soon as possible.

Site Info

  • “Edit Tools” is now called “Manage Tools”
  • “Page Order” is now called “Tool Order”

Lessons Tool

  • New type of content to add available: checklist
  • New column options

Resources

  • There is no longer a separate “Add” drop down, those functions are incorporated into the Actions drop down
  • There is now a Trash function for instructors, you can visit that area to restore (or fully remove a file) a file that you move to trash. Files will be available for restore for 30 days before being deleted (files will only be stored starting from the date of the upgrade)

Pages

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